Thursday, September 3, 2015

I am really excited that writing curriculums in schools don’t just focus on narrative and persuasive writing. In second grade, Smarty learned to write acrostic and sensory poems. She was happy to demonstrate her skills for me when I asked her to write some poems about leaves.
Creative Writing for Kids: Poems about leaves

Why Is Reading and Writing Poetry Important?

In elementary school kids are taking control of both grammar and vocabulary. Poetry forms with specific rules, such as haiku or acrostic allow them to think of words in a different way, focus on the beauty of the form and on choosing just the right words for their poems. I think acrostic can be especially effective in brainstorming words that fit the topic of the poem and start with the right letter. Writing poetry can be an amazing creative exercise for verbally gifted students allowing them to stretch their vocabulary and sentence building skills. And the result is just plain fun!

Acrostic and Sensory Poems About Leaves

Sensory poems can be helped by a graphic organizer. I wrote about them in this sensory poems post last year. This time Smarty didn’t use an organizer, and one sense is missing. She said that she remembered about smell, but she sort of combined her sensory taste and smell experiences together in her sensory poem about leaves.
LEAVES.
They FEEL dry and sharp, juicy and smooth.
They LOOK red and old, green and fresh.
They SOUND crunchy and crackly, a rustle in the wind.
They TASTE spicy and sharp, flavorful too.
Acrostic poems that Smarty wrote in school usually used one word per line. I know perfectly well that she could have written a more involved acrostic poem with a phrase per line, but clearly she was not in the mood:
Lovely
Entertaining
Amazing
Vibrant
Excellent
Somewhere and everywhere, they are there.
LEAVES!

Combining Writing and Art

Decorate Your Writing
Smarty typed up her poems on the computer and was willing to illustrate one. She was certainly not in "less is more" mood when she did that! She explained to me that she wanted to express the "whirliness of leaves" in her illustration. She was pretty happy with the result that you can see in the image below.

More Poetry Ideas for Kids?

From this blog:
Check out a great site Poetry for Kids to introduce kids to various poetic genres. 

Your Turn

Creative Writing for Kids: acrostic and sensory poems about leaves

Do your kids write poetry?

Teach Second Grade

Check out these activities united by the topic of Leaves:


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4 comments:

An Almost Unschooling Mom said...

If her illustrations are any indicator, I'd say poetry inspires her creativity!

Nicola Simpson said...

This is such a great way to encorage kids to write poetry.

Kristina said...

Beautiful way to explore fall leaves!

Ticia said...

Princess would be very happy if I did a poetry unit..... Maybe with Shakespeare?