Monday, September 19, 2011

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Solids Liquids Gases
I am trying to continue our tradition of doing “semi-science” activities on weekends supported by non-fiction books. I am starting to use Foundations of Scientific Understanding loosely as a guide for these forays of science. This week Smarty was delighted to learn that everything on Earth is made of matter, and that gases, liquids are solids represent states of matter.
Sep17_Ice2I froze some ice colored with food coloring. I also tried to insert toothpicks into ice to make sailboats, but this didn’t work for most of the ice blocks. Smarty’s first question (that she was able to answer on her own) was, “How did you make colored ice?”Sep17_Ice1 Launching ice boats and watching them melt was a clear success. There was also some observation of color mixing.Sep17_Ice3Me: Do you know where water goes when the puddle dries out? Smarty: Sure. It goes into air as a water vapor. And then comes back down as rain. So much for teaching something new. OK, for fairness sake, states of matter were new to her.

12 comments:

Viki and David said...

We read a book on Matter recently, too, and I felt like I'd been upstaged by Sid the Science Kid because the only thing that seemed new to Angelina was the word "state." State, ooooh. She also liked the definition of liquid being poured and taking the shape of its container and immediately asked: is jam a liquid or a solid?

I don't have a curriculum book but Angelina enjoys these "Hands On Approach" books from the library. I'm challenging A to collect the materials for the experiments and make a list of what is missing. (She's not in kindy so she has time. ;))

Mom and Kiddo said...

Kiddo likes to surprise me with knowledge I didn't know he had, too! It's amazing the way their minds are like a sponge. I'm afraid my mind is more like a sieve these days. Thanks for linking up!

hey said...

It's amazing the "stuff" they have stored-up in those little heads of theirs!

I'm always shocked at the knowledge MacGyver and Miss Enigma share. Where do they get it from?

jeannine: waddlee-ah-chaa

Ticia said...

I've had that happen more than I can say...... cough irreversible change cough cough........

I've heard the secret to putting toothpicks in for sails is to put tape over the ice cube tray and stick the toothpick through that. Then it'll stay.

Debbie said...

It always surprises me when Selena comes off with something that I didn't realize she knew. Goes to show that their little brains take in everything.

Another secret for tooth picks is to cover the tray with plastic wrap, poke the toothpicks through that.

MaryAnne said...

This looks like a fun activity! It isn't really warm enough for ice cubes here, anymore - only September and night temperatures dip to the low 40s already!

Julie said...

We have that book. I like the way it presents the different types of matter.

Kim said...

How do you like the Nebel book so far? I find some of it really simple since we did some science last year, but I think it's pretty easy to expand and add new info. I also like a lot of the reading suggestions at the back. I request most of them from the library, and it seems to help cement the info in Crumpet's brain..

An Almost Unschooling Mom said...

You can't go wrong with melting colored ice - it's almost as much fun as baking soda and vinegar :)

JDaniel4's Mom said...

JDaniel would love this activity.

MommyLabs said...

Coloured ice activities are always lots of fun and offer so much to observe and think for the curious minds.

That book sounds interesting. Will check it out.

Christy said...

We have to do this and get that book because C just had this lesson in school.