Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Your Skin and Mine

My daughter made it very clear to me that she still wants to learn more about human body when I tried to redirect her to geography track. So we are doing both as a result. I dug into our “Let’s Read and Find Out” books and pulled out Your Skin and Mine. We both quite liked it and ended up reading it many times even though it’s long and detailed. There were several places in the book Jan11_Fingerprints1_SM when children looked at different part of their skin through a magnifying glass. Anna enjoyed this activity – looking at her skin and comparing it with mine. She asked a lot of questions about birthmarks. I could explain them based on the information in the book – that melanin collects in certain parts of the body. She didn’t like the idea that her body has holes called pores, but was reassured to learn that the pores are small and she is not going to lose her skeleton through those holes.

She was not interested in touch experiment described in the book since she doesn’t like being blindfolded, Jan11_Fingerprints2_SMbut  we did fingerprinting experiment. We both made our fingerprints using our stamping pad and investigated them under a magnifying glass. Unfortunately, the prints were somewhat smudgy despite our best efforts, but you can still see that they are not the same. We also talked how we always leave fingerprints, and they are visible when our fingers are greasy/dirty. We went and looked at some on our walls and discussed (yet again) how important it is to wash our hands and not touch walls when our fingers are dirty. Oh well, as the famous quote says, one day they disappear, and then I will be wishing for their return on my walls.

For more science with young kids, visit Science Sunday at Adventures in Mommydom.

13 comments:

Elise said...

I really like how you use an inquiry based approach with your learning activities. It's fascinating to learn about what Anna is thinking through the questions she asks and comments she makes.

The fingerprint experiment is a neat idea, perfect for using the magnifying glass.

I had not even thought about doing measurement. Thank you for planting this seed for us and explaining your great ideas for introducing this topic.

An Almost Unschooling Mom said...

As much as I love the children, I can't imagine missing the days of dirty, handprint covered walls :)

Christy said...

We haven't done anything with fingerprints yet. Thanks for the idea.

MaryAnne said...

I have yet to brave fingerprint activities, and I've been wanting to do some magnifying glass activities. Of course, we need to own a magnifying glass first...

Ticia said...

I think fingerprints will be a summer activity here. I know there's several very cool kits that have all sorts of ideas for fingerprints.
I loved that she was worried about her bones coming out of her pores.

Diana said...

Fun idea! We have a little magnifying glass that my boys love looking through. Maybe we'll be brave and stamp our fingerprints and examine them.

Debbie said...

Love the fingerprint idea. We will have to do something like this sometime down the road.

Susana said...

This is fun. I love this series of books and often forget we have some.

Anna has such a curious mind and the way it is always turning fascinates me!!

The fingerprints activity sounds fun.

Kim said...

I love that she was worried her skeleton would escape through her pores - their little minds are amazing. How lucky that you just got a magnifying glass! Crumpet and I were just discussing fingerprints and looking through our magnifying glass, but we made no prints. We'll have to remember to do that.

Infant Bibliophile said...

Love the skeleton coming out of the pores comment!!

Sherri said...

science is one area I have not touched on with my preschooler...I am excited to try it!

Cindy said...

Great idea. We need to do this one. I used to do an activity just like this with my 7th graders when we were discussing genetics.

Emma @ P is for Preschooler said...

We tried this too and our fingerprints were also too smudgy to really see very well. How do the police do it so well? lol!