Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Dec22_MiniLuc2

I have never heard of MiniLUK until we received it from our friends who went back to Germany as a birthday present for Anna. We didn’t give it to her then, because she had so many other presents, but we finally gave it to her now as an early Christmas present. It’s a learning game that is quite popular in Germany. First of all, you need a controller that you can see in the picture and can buy  MiniLUK from Amazon here. By itself it’s a fun (and quite challenging) exercise for young children to put 12 plastic squares in proper places with proper rotation. Once the squares are in place, the game can start. To play the game, you also need special cards that come bound into a book. Ours were with instructions in German (and with some German words in some puzzles that are not needed to play a game successfully), but apparently you can also buy English books for different ages here. This is the most fun part about this whole concept, because cards can be Dec22_MiniLuc1made for any age. Our present came with three booklets – one for preschool with matching shapes, numbers and letters, another one is called “Kindergarten Olympics” with more challenging logical puzzles and yet another is “In the House” where the puzzles are mostly about matching parts to whole. My husband told me that he played with MiniLUK in teenage years as well, but the puzzles were a lot more challenging. The idea of the game is that one solves one square at a time (for example, finding a match between a shadow image on the bottom and the actual picture on top) and then places a proper plastic square to the transparent side of the controller. Once all 12 squares are matched, one can flip the controller, and self-check on the other side. If you solved it correctly, the color pieces on the other end will make some sort of a picture that is included on the side of the card. Interestingly, Anna first got the idea and played several games relatively easily, but as the puzzles got harder she started to fumble with the setup (which doesn’t change between games, it’s always the same) – it got too much for her. Note to myself – not to do more than 2 puzzles at a time, even if she wants to do more. I can see us buying more books in the future and also possibly making some homemade ones – it’s not impossible to do once you get several basic templates for self-checking.

8 comments:

Debbie said...

Sounds like an interesting learning tool. I don't believe I have ever heard of it before. Thank you for sharing.

MaryAnne said...

I never heard of this either - it sound interesting.

Kim said...

This looks really neat. I think Discovery Toys has something sort of similar.

The girl who painted trees said...

I have a similar toy from my childhood, except it is a 4 by 4 template and the books it comes with are quite challenging. I am thinking of showing it to bear when she is 3 or 4. Well, surely I'll try at three and see, but I'm thinking she'll have an easier time with it at 4. Anna's sounds good b/c of the different levels.

http://theadventuresofbear.blogspot.com

Elise said...

I find it fascinating to hear about popular learning tools and toys from other countires. This sounds like a challenging, yet rewarding activity.

It's great to hear that your reorganisation of Anna's boxes is working well. Savvy has not used zig zag scissors yet, but I think she would really enjoy cutting with them.

I am really looking forward to organising our activities and set up after Christmas.

Tara Rison said...

I love this! I am going to get it for Wes for his birthday in January. Thanks for sharing!

Ticia said...

Are the books reusable? I have to say I think German games are the best. Most of the games that Jeff and I play ourselves are of German origin translated into English.

Susana said...

I'd never heard of this either. You share some very unique toys, games and learning resources that are very interesting to me and always peak my curiousity.

Thanks!